Skip to Main Content
Sign In
Visit Apply Give

Archive : Mathematical Medicine and Biology Seminar

Image Picker for Section 0

 

 

Dr Eric Kmiec Helen F. Graham Cancer Center & Research Institute Christiana Care Health System Dr Eric Kmiec Helen F. Graham Cancer Center & Research Institute Christiana Care Health System Ewing 336Title:CRISPR-directed Human Gene Editing: Clinical Application for Sickle Cell Disease</br></br> Abstract: TBA 2/21/2018 7:30:00 PM2/21/2018 8:20:00 PMFalse
Dr Ashutosh Khandha, Delaware Rehabilitation Institute, UD Dr Ashutosh Khandha, Delaware Rehabilitation Institute, UDEWG 336Title: Title: Knee biomechanical and biochemical variables early after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction - mathematical modeling and experimentation <br></br> Abstract: Premature knee osteoarthritis (OA) after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) is a growing concern in a young population. 30 % of subjects with ACLR have radiographic knee OA 5 years after surgery. Using experimental gait analysis and electromyography-informed mathematical neuromusculoskeletal modeling, we have seen that those with OA at 5 years can show inter-limb differences in “biomechanical” knee gait variables (joint loading and kinematics) as early as 6 months after surgery. Also, quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI) has the potential to detect “biochemical” OA related changes in the knee cartilage, earlier than radiographs. High values of cartilage T2 relaxation time, a qMRI time constant, can indicate early OA onset changes (collagen matrix degradation). Currently, it is not known whether both inter-limb differences in knee gait variables as well as cartilage T2 values are present as early as 3 months after ACLR. As the first step of a longitudinal study, we investigated these biomechanical and biochemical variables in 15 subjects, at both 3 and 6 months after ACLR. The overall goal of the study is to evaluate the changes in these variables over time (up to 2 years after ACLR) and to evaluate how soon can OA related changes be detected. The sooner the detection, the greater the potential for intervention to delay OA progression.11/15/2017 7:30:00 PM11/15/2017 8:20:00 PMFalse
Vu DinhVu Dinh9/27/2017 6:30:00 PM9/27/2017 7:20:00 PMFalse
Rebecca Sanft (University of North Carolina at Asheville)Rebecca Sanft (University of North Carolina at Asheville)EWG 336Title: Modeling the Mechanical Response of Arteries Abstract: Unlike traditional engineering materials, arterial tissue exhibits anisotropic and highly nonlinear mechanical behavior, and it displays the fascinating ability to grow and adapt to a given mechanical environment. This talk aims to provide an overview of the theoretical framework for modeling the mechanical response of arteries that reflects aspects of the fiber structure, muscle contraction, and growth. Moreover, we will discuss mathematical tools that can help us understand and predict alterations such as buckling and folding in arterial morphology.9/20/2017 6:30:00 PM9/20/2017 7:20:00 PMFalse

Page Settings and MetaData:
(Not Shown on the Page)
Page Settings
Archive
No
MetaData for Search Engine Optimization
Archive
<a target='_blank' href='/Lists/Mathematical Medicine and Biology Seminar/calendar.aspx' class='ms-promotedActionButton'> <span style='font-size:16px;margin-right:5px;position:relative;top:2px;' class='fa fa-pencil-square-o'></span><span class='ms-promotedActionButton-text'>EDIT CALENDAR</span> </a> WebPartEditorsOnly
  • Department of Mathematical Sciences
  • University of Delaware
  • 501 Ewing Hall
  • Newark, DE 19716, USA
  • Phone: 302-831-2653
  • math-questions@udel.edu