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Carl Rees Lectures in Mathematical SciencesCarl Rees Lectures in Mathematical Sciences127 Memorial HallSpeaker: Mike Shelley, Courant Institute <br></br> Title: Active structures and active matter models <br></br> Abstract: Many biological structures, like the mitotic spindle and nucleus within a cell, are self-assembled and only maintained by the activity of its constituents. These aspects of assembly and maintenance of coherent structures by activity are the hallmarks of problems in the field of "active matter", which also encompasses the study of active assemblies like bird flocks and fish schools, and, increasingly, designed and synthesized active fluids and materials. I'll discuss active structures in cellular biophysics, as well as simpler "bio-synthetic" active materials, which are helping us (hopefully!) build the needed mathematical tools to study more complex biological phenomena.11/3/2017 7:30:00 PM11/3/2017 8:30:00 PMFalse
Carl Rees Lectures in Mathematical SciencesCarl Rees Lectures in Mathematical Sciences123 Memorial HallSpeaker: Mike Shelley, Courant Institute <br></br> Title: Computational Methods and Models for Biomechanics Problems in the Cell <br></br> Abstract: Pronuclear centering and spindle positioning is a fundamental dynamics problem in organismal development, and constitutes a very complex fluid- structure interaction problem involving bodies being moved by immersed biopolymers and motor-proteins. I will discuss specialized computational methods, based on singularity and boundary integral methods, we have developed for efficiently studying such problems, as well as coarse- graining methods for evolving suspensions of microtubules. I'll end by discussing open areas and problems. 11/2/2017 7:30:00 PM11/2/2017 8:30:00 PMFalse
Francisco Sayas, Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of DelawareFrancisco Sayas, Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of DelawareGore 104Title: The mathematical and numerical life of the single layer potential, from Coulomb to Huygens Abstract: I will offer a light introduction (with many formulas, but barely any theorems) to the ideas behind the theory of layer potentials to represent the solutions of several well known PDEs. With origins well rooted in electrostatics, charge distributions on the surface of a conductor become mathematical entities that can be transferred to domains where they have no physical meaning, while they are still useful for computation. I will describe the work of my team in trying to reveal mathematical properties of discrete layer potentials and their applications to several problems in acoustics, elastodynamics, and electromagnetism. 5/5/2017 7:30:00 PM5/5/2017 9:30:00 PMFalse
Michael Vogelius, Director of the Division of Mathematical Sciences, National Science FoundationMichael Vogelius, Director of the Division of Mathematical Sciences, National Science FoundationGore 104Small inhomogeneities and uniform expansions applications to enhanced detectability and approximate invisibility. <br><br> In this talk I shall give a survey of some older results and a discussion of some newer results concerning the perturbative effects of small inhomogeneities on the electromagnetic fields. I shall relate these results to enhanced imaging as well as to approximate cloaking, the latter by use of so-called (singular) mapping techniques. 3/17/2017 7:30:00 PM3/17/2017 9:30:00 PMFalse

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